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Posts Tagged ‘Cataloging’

Many hands make light work

Many hands make light work

LibraryThing is organizing what it calls a Flash-Mob Cataloging Party  on Nov. 15 to catalog the approximately 1200 books in the collection of St. John’s Episcopal Church in my old back yard, Beverley, MA. The idea is to create for them a complete LibraryThing catalog.  Why the party? Well:

 [I]t’s not always easy for a single overworked volunteer to catalog a big collection. So we thought we’d try a “flash-mob” cataloging party and see how fast we can enter an entire library into LibraryThing. A bunch of us will be there with laptops and barcode scanners in hand—and we’re inviting anyone in the area to join us.  

I must say that I am intrigued by the notion of a “mob” cataloging. I also hadn’t realized that small libraries were actually using LibraryThing as a catalog– as you probably know, it was envisioned as a tool for individuals. You can find out more about that aspect by clicking on a link in the story that will take you to an explanation of how LibraryThing can be used by organizations.

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A fellow reader of AUTOCAT linked to a brief business article in the New York Times which will interest librarians in general, but catalogers in particular. Can’t Decide? Look for the Label describes a study in which students were shown the same 144 magazines in two make-believe store settings. In the one, the magazines were divided into 3 subject categories. In the other they were divided into 18 subject categories. The students thought that store 2 provided much greater variety of magazine choices.  I, personally, am not going to rush out and add more subject headings to the records in my catalog but the phenomenon described in the article does intrigue me. It applies to coffee, too!

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